A Greener Cooler More Liveable City

At City of Port Phillip we have smart solutions for a sustainable future and are striving to be a Greener Cooler More Liveable City.



What is it?

With increased densification, more concrete and average temperatures increasing, we are finding that the City is getting hotter.

Creating green (parks, trees, gardens) and blue (drainage areas, flood storage) connections enhances public open spaces, making cities more vibrant, inviting in biodiversity and cooling the surrounding area. 



Council Projects - Wildlife Corridor

Port Phillip Council has teamed up with a small group of passionate residents to create a wildlife corridor in a residential street in Albert Park.

The wildlife corridor, located within the wide central median strip on Danks Street, will provide important habitat for threatened wildlife, and enhance the health and longevity of existing large native trees.

The project works are due to be completed by the end of May and will involve the planting of 122 new native trees, 600 new indigenous plants and shrubs, and the installation of 32 nesting boxes.

Albert Park College students will use the new wildlife corridor as an outdoor classroom and research project, using high-tech scientific methods to monitor animal populations and the health of native vegetation.

The wildlife corridor has been designed to provide homes and breeding spaces for a variety of species including lorikeets, rosellas and microbats. Many native birds and bats rely on tree hollows for breeding and survival.

Council hopes this project will form part of a future network of wildlife corridors across the City of Port Phillip and broader metropolitan Melbourne.



Measuring Progress

jjjjjjjjs.jpg.png


Council Deliverables

  1. Implement the Greening Port Phillip Strategy and Street Tree Planting Program, including ongoing investment in species diversification, park trees, streetscape improvements and a stronger focus on enhancing biodiversity by planting indigenous and climate tolerant species

  2. Implement the Foreshore and Hinterland Vegetation Management Plan

  3. Develop a Biodiversity Study and Action Plan

  4. Maintain heat mapping and solar analysis data. Use data, along with Socio-Economic Index for Area and flood data to guide project and service delivery. Communicate information to the community through a web-based platform

  5. Deliver technical guidance and implement regulatory interventions to protect vegetation and increase canopy cover on private property, including green roofs, walls and facades

  6. Encourage and enforce sustainable, climate resilient buildings through the planning process by applying environmentally sustainable design planning policy guidelines and by providing clear, accessible information to the community



A City That is Adapting and Resilient to Climate Change

At City of Port Phillip we have smart solutions for a sustainable future and are striving to be a City that is adapting and resilient to climate change.

What is it

Climate change is already having an impact around the world. We must prepare for a different future where extreme heat events, flooding, coastal storm surges and drought are more prevalent requires commitment, innovation and collaboration.

We are committed to increasing our resilience, ensuring changing environmental conditions won’t affect our ability to deliver the services that support our business community and residents.

Council Project - Climate Vulnerability Assessment

The City of Port Phillip owns and controls a wide range of assets from land and buildings to roads, drains, footpaths and open space.

Council is working with climate experts to identify the vulnerability of each asset in relation to climate change. We will use this information to inform how we plan, renew and maintain our assets to consider their impact on the environment and resiliency to the effects of climate change.

Measuring progress

Measuring the impact our action will have on our community’s resilience to climate change is difficult as most of the benefits are dependent on an individual’s perception of comfort and safety, which is different for everyone. To ensure we keep track of how the community is impacted by climate change we will monitor several indicators and use these to help us plan for improved service delivery.

These indicators are:

  • number of houses impacted by extreme weather

  • temperature hotspots

  • use of Council facilities in extreme weather.

  • We will also measure and report:

  • actions taken to retrofit Council buildings to combat climate change.

 

Council Deliverables

  1. Implement the Greening Port Phillip Strategy and Street Tree Planting Program, including ongoing investment in species diversification, park trees, streetscape improvements and a stronger focus on enhancing biodiversity by planting indigenous and climate tolerant species

  2. Implement the Foreshore and Hinterland Vegetation Management Plan

  3. Develop a Biodiversity Study and Action Plan

  4. Maintain heat mapping and solar analysis data. Use data, along with Socio-Economic Index for Areas and flood data to guide project and service delivery. Communicate information to the community through a web-based platform

  5. Deliver technical guidance and implement regulatory interventions to protect vegetation and increase canopy cover on private property, including green roofs, walls and facades

  6. Encourage and enforce sustainable, climate resilient buildings through the planning process by applying environmentally sustainable design planning policy guidelines and by providing clear, accessible information to the community

 

A City With Lower Carbon Emissions

At City of Port Phillip we have smart solutions for a sustainable future and are striving to be a City with lower carbon emissions.

What is it?

One of the most significant challenges the world faces is transitioning away from our use of fossil fuels and reducing our carbon emissions.

Council is committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions in an attempt to keep the global temperature rise to under two degrees.

Council Projects - Melbourne Renewable Energy Project (MREP)

From 1 January 2019 all Council’s electricity has been powered by renewable sources. All our electricity, from the lights in our streets and barbecues in our parks to our libraries, childcare centres and town halls, is running on renewables.

City of Port Phillip is part of an innovative wind power project that will reduce its total emissions by 87 per cent. The project marks the first time in Australia that a group of local governments, cultural institutions, universities and corporations have collectively purchased renewable energy from a newly built facility.

The electricity is sourced from a new purpose-built 80MW wind farm at Crowlands, a small agricultural community north of Ararat. The project created more than 140 regional jobs during construction as well as eight ongoing maintenance jobs. Pacific Hydro has installed 25 of the 39 turbines required with the project expected to be fully completed in May.

The 14 organisations involved in the Project purchase 88 GWh of electricity each year, enough to power more than 17,000 households. Our MREP partners include; City of Melbourne, Yarra, and Moreland councils, as well as Australia Post, Bank Australia, the National Australia Bank, Melbourne University, Federation Square, Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre and Zoos Victoria.

MREP represents a major step towards achieving our target of zero net emissions by 2027/28.

 

Measuring Progress

jfjsghsg.jpg.png


Council Deliverables

  1. Deliver behaviour change and education programs through the Sustainable City Community Action Plan and support environmental education programs in schools

  2. Review Council services to identify opportunities to reduce carbon emissions and implement changes

  3. Reduce energy use in Council buildings by investing in renewable energy, energy efficiency in Council Buildings and changing our behaviour

  4. Increase the sustainability of South Melbourne Market by installing renewable energy

  5. Embed sustainability into Council’s procurement and investment policies and practices, including minimum sustainability performance requirements for suppliers

  6. Introduce green lease provisions targeting tenant energy consumption, cleaning and waste management into new and renewed leases of Council buildings

  7. Transition the Council fleet to zero emissions, prioritising electric vehicles and charging stations, traditional and electric bikes, car share and low emissions vehicles

  8. Where viable, progressively convert Council buildings to fully electric power through maintenance and renewal programs

  9. Deliver an energy efficient street lighting upgrade (category V lights)

  10. Deliver a program that supports households, particularly those on a low income, to invest in sustainability retrofits, solar panels and pay back their investment through an alternative financing arrangement (SCCAP)

  11. Work with partners to drive the uptake of Environmental Upgrade Agreements for commercial and (legislation pending) residential buildings (SCCAP)

A Sustained Reduction in Waste

At City of Port Phillip we have smart solutions for a sustainable future and are striving to be a City with a sustained reduction in waste.

 

What is it?

The growth and increased densification of our City is placing increased pressure on waste services. We currently produce more waste, and recycle less than the average metropolitan Melbourne household and we need to turn this around.

We must work collaboratively as a community to achieve four priority outcomes and become:

  • A City that reduces waste

  • A City that maximises reuse and recycling

  • A City with clean streets, public spaces and foreshore areas

  • A City that uses new technology to process waste better and reduce environmental impacts

 

Council Projects - E-Waste and Battery Bins

Residents can now easily drop off their e-waste and batteries at local libraries knowing they will be safely recycled. Council has introduced recycling bins to local libraries to improve recycling rates. From 1 July this year, e-waste will be banned from landfill, including kerbside general waste and recycling bins.

E-waste is the fastest growing category of waste worldwide. An estimated one in five Australians are have a stash of unwanted e-waste items, from mobile phones and laptops to batteries, in their home or office.

As well as hazardous materials, e-waste also contains valuable resources which can be reused. By recycling e-waste, you reduce landfill, protect the air and waterways from harmful materials, minimise raw materials consumption to produce electronic products and reduce greenhouse gases created in the production of new materials.

Measuring Progress

djdjhs.jpg.png

Actions

jjfjs.jpg.png

Water Sensitive City

At City of Port Phillip we have smart solutions for a sustainable future and are striving to be a Water Sensitive City.

What is it?

Water Sensitive Cities are resilient, liveable, productive and sustainable.

In a water sensitive city, we interact with the urban water cycle in ways that:

  • provide the water security essential for economic prosperity through efficient use of diverse available resources

  • enhance and protect the health of waterways and wetlands, the river basins that surround them, and the coast and bays

  • mitigate flood risk and damage; and

  • create public spaces that collect, clean, and recycle water.

Council Projects - Alma Park Upgrade

Saving valuable drinking water is a high priority for the City of Port Phillip as we look to a sustainable future. The scheme will capture and treat stormwater from the Alma Stormwater drain, store it under the Alma Park sports field and then use it to irrigate the sports field and adjacent park areas. Up to 18 megalitres of stormwater will be captured and reused by the scheme each year.

The scheme includes:

  • a gross pollutant trap to remove large rubbish and sediment from the stormwater as it enters the system

  • a bioretention system, which is like a large garden bed, that will remove fine sediments and pollutants such as nutrients and heavy metals. The bioretention system will have a surface area of 230 m²

  • Storage tanks totalling with capacity of over 1 MegaLitre, which is about half the size of an Olympic sized swimming pool

  • a small treatment shed, that includes ultraviolet treatment as the final water treatment stage

  • an access track that uses ‘grass cells’ so that we can access the site with heavy vehicles while maintaining grass coverage.

This will significantly reduce the need to irrigate the park area with drinking water. It will also provide an alternative source of water for our open spaces and will increase our water security, particularly in drier times, and improve the quality of water entering the bay.

Find out more

Measuring Progress

fffff.jpg.png

Council Deliverables

  1. Develop a Water Sensitive City Plan to drive an integrated approach to water management

  2. Reduce water use by renewing irrigation infrastructure and improving controls and management while maintaining highly valued green spaces

  3. Investigate and implement high value opportunities for stormwater harvesting to provide alternatives to potable water use for key Council open spaces

  4. Support plans for recycled water processing at Fishermans Bend, with water being used by residents and for irrigation of Council reserves

  5. Investigate mechanisms to require onsite stormwater detention in new developments and technology to monitor tank levels and empty prior to storm events

  6. Implement the Elster Creek Action Plan

  7. Develop and implement a Stormwater Asset Management Plan and invest in drainage improvements

  8. Plan and deliver Water Sensitive Urban Design projects to reduce the amount of pollution entering Port Phillip Bay

  9. Complete a study of permeability potential for Council land and introduce place-based permeability targets. Embed these standards into our maintenance and construction programs

  10. Update Council policy and engage with the community to achieve greater permeability on private property